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Research

 

Our research projects are related to the field of neuroscience and include whole proteome analyses of defined subcellular structures, quantitative protein profiling, biomarker discovery, and screening for protein interaction partners. A current focus in collaboration with the Dept. of Neurogenetics of our institute is the proteome analysis of myelin from central and peripheral nervous system (de Monasterio-Schrader et al., Cell Mol Life Sci 2012; Patzig et al., J Neurosci 2011). Please visit our myelin proteome web resource for further details.

 

Independent research pursued by our group includes the characterization of peptide-protein and protein-protein interactions by photoaffinity labeling (PAL). PAL, especially in combination with mass spectrometric characterization of the covalent photoadducts, is a powerful tool for the investigation of peptide-protein interactions (Jahn et al., PNAS 2002) and was previously used by us for the identification of calmodulin (CaM) binding sites in Munc13-1, a presynaptic protein essential for neurotransmission (Junge et al., Cell 2004). Now, we apply PAL to study CaM binding of all Munc13 isoforms and to derive structural information on their CaM complexes (see Lipstein et al., Mol Cell Biol 2012 and other own references therein).

 

In addition to these lines of research, we have established selected long-term collaborations with external partners. See there for project details and joint publications.






October 30, 2018

 

Proteomic phenotyping platform contributes to the identification of a signalling pathway regulating neuron polarity.




 

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April 16, 2018

 

SUMO and aging.




 

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